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Walden, or the life in the woods, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience

EGP 260.00

الكاتب

  • In 1817, Henry David Thoreau was born in Massachusetts. He graduated from Harvard University in 1837, taught briefly, then turned to writing and lecturing. Becoming a Transcendentalist and good friend of Emerson, Thoreau lived the life of simplicity he advocated in his writings. His two-year experience in a hut in Walden, on land owned by Emerson, resulted in the classic, Walden: Life in the Woods (1854). During his sojourn there, Thoreau refused to pay a poll tax in protest of slavery and the Mexican war, for which he was jailed overnight. His activist convictions were expressed in the groundbreaking On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1849). In a diary he noted his disapproval of attempts to convert the Algonquins "from their own superstitions to new ones." In a journal he noted dryly that it is appropriate for a church to be the ugliest building in a village, "because it is the one in which human nature stoops to the lowest and is the most disgraced." (Cited by James A. Haught in 2000 Years of Disbelief.) When Parker Pillsbury sought to talk about religion with Thoreau as he was dying from tuberculosis, Thoreau replied: "One world at a time."

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الوصف

“Walden” is structured as a personal narrative, interspersed with philosophical reflections, observations of nature, and social commentary. Thoreau discusses his reasons for living in solitude, his interactions with nature, and his experiments in self-sufficiency. He advocates for a return to a more deliberate and mindful way of living, away from the distractions and materialism of modern society.

“On the Duty of Civil Disobedience” is an essay also written by Thoreau, which was first published in 1849. In this essay, Thoreau argues for the moral obligation of individuals to resist unjust laws and government actions through nonviolent protest and civil disobedience. Thoreau famously refused to pay his poll tax as a protest against the Mexican-American War and slavery, which led to his brief imprisonment. This experience inspired “Civil Disobedience.”

The essay discusses the individual’s responsibility to follow their conscience and principles, even if it means opposing the government. Thoreau emphasizes the importance of personal integrity and the need to prioritize one’s own moral convictions over obedience to unjust laws. “Civil Disobedience” has had a significant influence on political and social movements advocating for justice and equality, including Mahatma Gandhi’s nonviolent resistance movement in India and the civil rights movement in the United States led by figures like Martin Luther King Jr.

الكاتب

  • In 1817, Henry David Thoreau was born in Massachusetts. He graduated from Harvard University in 1837, taught briefly, then turned to writing and lecturing. Becoming a Transcendentalist and good friend of Emerson, Thoreau lived the life of simplicity he advocated in his writings. His two-year experience in a hut in Walden, on land owned by Emerson, resulted in the classic, Walden: Life in the Woods (1854). During his sojourn there, Thoreau refused to pay a poll tax in protest of slavery and the Mexican war, for which he was jailed overnight. His activist convictions were expressed in the groundbreaking On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1849). In a diary he noted his disapproval of attempts to convert the Algonquins "from their own superstitions to new ones." In a journal he noted dryly that it is appropriate for a church to be the ugliest building in a village, "because it is the one in which human nature stoops to the lowest and is the most disgraced." (Cited by James A. Haught in 2000 Years of Disbelief.) When Parker Pillsbury sought to talk about religion with Thoreau as he was dying from tuberculosis, Thoreau replied: "One world at a time."

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